Monthly Archives: May 2017

| ART | Robert Rauschenberg Among Friends at MoMA

The early 1950s, when Rauschenberg (1925–2008) launched his career, was the heyday of the heroic gestural painting of Abstract Expressionism. Rauschenberg challenged this tradition with an egalitarian approach to materials, bringing the stuff of the everyday world into his art. Working alone and in collaboration with artists, dancers, musicians, and writers, he invented new, interdisciplinary modes of artistic practice that helped set the course for art of the present day. The ethos that permeates Rauschenberg’s work—openness, commitment to dialogue and collaboration, and global curiosity—makes him, now more than ever, a touchstone for our troubled times.

The exhibition is organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Tate Modern, London.

Organized by Leah Dickerman, The Marlene Hess Curator of Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art, and Achim Borchardt-Hume, Director of Exhibitions at Tate Modern, with Emily Liebert and Jenny Harris, Curatorial Assistants, Department of Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art. The exhibition design was created in collaboration with the artist Charles Atlas.

| SAVE THE DATE | Wolf Live Auction May 31

BROOKLYN BOWL
61 WYTHE AVENUE
BROOKLYN, NY, 11249

Advanced tickets to this event are SOLD OUT! We will have a limited number of admissions available to purchase at 7:00 PM. All admissions at the door will be first come first serve, one ticket per customer, with no re entry. $100 at the door, cash only.

WOLF (JERRY GARCIA’S LEGENDARY GUITAR) LIVE AUCTION
Full lineup below!

Joe Russo’s Friends with Benefits featuring:
– John Scofield
– Nels Cline (Wilco)
– Neal Casal (Chris Robinson Brotherhood, Circles Around The Sun)
– Billy Martin (Medeski Martin & Wood)
– Joe Russo
– Cass McCombs
– Dave Dreiwitz (Ween, Joe Russo’s Almost Dead)
– Dave Harrington (Darkside, Hooteroll? + Plus)
– Tom Hamilton (Joe Russo’s Almost Dead)
– Delicate Steve
– Scott Metzger (Joe Russo’s Almost Dead)
– Jon Shaw (Bob Weir, Shakey Graves)
– Erik Deutsch (Charlie Hunter, Hooteroll? + Plus)
– Alecia Chakour (Tedeschi Trucks Band)
– Eric D Johnson (Fruit Bats)
– Jonathan Goldberger (Red Baraat, Hooteroll? + Plus)
– Cochemea Gastelum (Dap-Kings)

For millions of passionate Grateful Dead fans, there is only one “Wolf”: Jerry Garcia’s beloved guitar. Customized by luthier Doug Irwin, Wolf was delivered to Jerry and first appeared in a 1973 New York City performance the Grateful Dead gave for the Hells Angels. Over the following two decades, Wolf became almost as well known as the performer himself as it appeared in countless concerts and on treasured recordings throughout Jerry’s fabled career.

Years after the musician’s passing, Wolf returned to Doug and was sold in a 2002 Guernsey’s auction conducted at NYC’s electric Studio 54, where it fetched close to $1 million, more than doubling the existing world record. Now, Wolf’s buyer, wishing to support the important efforts of the Southern Poverty Law Center and its continuing fight against racism and hate groups, has returned Wolf to Guernsey’s for an unprecedented one lot auction of this most treasured guitar. The proceeds of the winning high bid on this extraordinary instrument will go to SPLC. This Guernsey’s event, additionally supported by the Relix Group, will be held on May 31st, live at the fabulous Brooklyn Bowl in New York City. Absentee bidders will also be accommodated.

From San Francisco’s Winterland Ballroom to NYC’s Palladium to Egypt’s Great Pyramids, Jerry and Wolf travelled, appearing in front of massive, passionate audiences. It is no wonder that the devoted Deadhead who purchased the Wolf in 2002 has said, “I’ve been a fan of The Dead since I was a kid, and playing this iconic guitar over the past 15 years has been a privilege. But the time is right for Wolf to do some good. My wife and I have long supported the efforts of the Southern Poverty Law Center, and if ever we needed the SPLC, we sure do need them now.”

Rarely, if ever, has there been an item as memorable and noteworthy as the Wolf being sold in support of such a worthy cause. Guernsey’s is thrilled that the return of Wolf will go a long way to combat racism and injustice across the country.

Brooklyn Bowl is proud to present on May 31st a spectacular Guernsey’s auction event, where celebrated musicians will have a chance to play Wolf one last time before it finds a new owner. Those interested in bidding on Wolf, or attending the auction and preview events should visit www.guernseys.com or contact the auction house in New York at 212-794-2280.

All Auction and Show proceeds donated to Southern Poverty Law Center.

| SUNDAY READING | ReFUSING FASHION: Rei Kawakubo

One of the most influential figures in contemporary fashion design receives critical attention in this volume published after the exhibition ReFusing Fashion: Rei Kawakubo at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Detroit. The purpose of the exhibition was to present Kawakubo’s clothes, shops, designed ephemera-like posters and advertisements, and her collaborations with architects, photographers, and the great dancer and choreographer Merce Cunningham. Kawakubo, through her clothing line Comme des Garcons, has re-formed and re-thought fashion from the widest of perspectives, combining ideas from the fashion and cultural histories of Asia, Africa and the West in assembled garments, or by tearing things apart to transform inherited ideas and make something very new. Cathy Horyn writing in the New York Times Style Magazine for Spring 2008 explained, Kawakubo, working more in the spirit of an artist than any designer today, attacks the problems of consciousness.

The museum’s exhibition committee, a group of artists, art historians, collectors and curators, took a fine art approach to the organization, seeing the exhibition as an installation, and a Gesamtkunstwerk, or total work of art: all the pieces together revealing the whole. To understand the work, you need to see, sense and witness its majestic variety and uncompromising originality — a dress with four arm holes in 1979; a jacket with the back cut up then tied together in 1988; a jacket with four sleeves: two regular, two kimono from 2003; garments sewn, tied, wrapped, pinned and assembled from others; seams frayed turning inside out, holes made and found, fabrics invented, pop art flowers, motorcycle jackets shaped like baseball gloves, capes with the geometry of an Amish quilt or Navajo blanket and a bride so contemporary that the decorations on her gown are printed images not made of actual fabric, but reproducible histories.

The book was designed to capture the flowing exhibition from all angles. The book designers and exhibition photographer developed a system of standing in fixed locations throughout the space and taking photos while turning around in a 360 degree circle. The photos start on the cover and continue throughout the book, alternating with pages of text, to create a sense that the pages have insides and outsides similar to clothing.

In addition to photographs of the exhibition, the book includes photos by Timothy Greenfield-Sanders of Kawakubo’s costume designs for Merce Cunningham, photos from select Comme des Garcons fashion shows, a chronology, and essays by Harold Koda, curator in charge at the Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, architect Sylvia Lavin, Judith Thurman, writer for the New Yorker, and art historian Michael Stone-Richards.