Category Archives: Friends of SSWTR

| SSWTR & Friends | HUICHICA WEST 2017

TICKETS ON SALE HERE 

GUNDLACH BUNDSCHU WINERY

JUNE 9 & 10, 2017

ALLAH LAS  

CASS MCCOMBS

BEACHWOOD SPARKS

DEAN WAREHAM (plays GALAXIE 500)

ROBYN HITCHCOCK

HERON OBLIVION

CAVE SINGERS

THE TYDE

GOSPELBEACH

BRITTA PHILLIPS

MATTSON 2 (play A LOVE SUPREME) 

JOE PUG

TIM COHEN

ONCE & FUTURE BAND

BOOGARINS

MR ELEVATOR

TARA JANE ONIEL

PESOS

GREG LOIACONO

WLLIAM TYLER

BILLY CHANGER

M ROSS PERKINS

OMAR VALESCO & THE MOTHER TONGUES

MAPACHE

ALINA HARDIN

BIG SEARCH

OUTER EMBASSY

TWO SHEDS

| SSWTR & Friends | Becca Albee

Rirkrit Tiravanija
untitled 2017 (tomorrow is the question, january 21, 2017), 2017
Acrylic and newspaper on linen
89 1/4 x 73 1/4 inches
Courtesy Rirkrit Tiravanija and Gavin Brown’s enterprise, New York/Rome
(c) Rirkrit Tiravanija

The Times

JUNE 1 – AUGUST 11, 2017

Press Release PDFThe FLAG Art Foundation presents The Times from June 1 – August 11, 2017, on its 9th floor gallery. The exhibition uses The New York Times as its point of departure and features over 80 artists, artist duos, and collectives who use the “paper of record” to address and reframe issues that impact our everyday lives.

Reading The New York Times is embedded in many people’s daily routines. This chronicle of geopolitical and local issues, tragedies, human interest stories, and trends in culture, serves as both a source of inspiration and medium for artists to assert their perspectives on the state of the world. In the wake of the 2016 presidential election, where news media was deemed the “the enemy of the people,” and The New York Times directly attacked and labeled as “fake news,” FLAG began developing an exhibition examining how seminal artists, such as Robert Gober, Ellsworth Kelly, Lorraine O’Grady, Fred Tomaselli, and others, who have used and been inspired by this newspaper in their practice. To give voice to a larger community, FLAG put out an open call for artist submissions that received 400+ proposals from around the world, and accounts for over half of the artists featured in the exhibition.

As its title suggests, The Times focuses on works on the paper itself, and includes drawings, paintings, photography, and collage, as well as video, podcasts, and performance. Some artists insert themselves directly in the physical document of the paper, while others are interested in the seriality of the newspaper as a means of marking time, investigating its coded language, or rewriting history. The works address a range of issues: gender, race, police violence and capital punishment, the HIV/AIDS epidemic, the global financial crisis of 2007-08, September 11th, presidential elections, etc.

Central to the exhibition is Ellsworth Kelly’s collage Ground Zero, 2003, a poignant proposition for a public memorial to September 11th. Kelly superimposed a green trapezoid over an image of Ground Zero (featured on the cover of the Arts & Leisure section of The New York Times) to represent a gentle slope of grass meant for people to congregate and remember. Rirkrit Tiravanija’s untitled 2017 (tomorrow is the question, January 21, 2017), 2017, overlays a provocative question on top of a day’s headlines, playfully and pointedly addressing a pervasive sense of anxiety and uncertainty. Agnieszka Kurant’s Future Anterior, 2008, is a version of The New York Times from the year 2020, rendered in disappearing ink. For the project, Kurant collaborated with professional clairvoyant Krzysztof Jackowski to predict future headlines, and enlisted several New York Times journalists and ghostwriters to pen the articles. Yesterday’s Newspaper, 2007, by Dave McKenzie, explores the newspaper’s seriality as a means of marking time, featuring a low, wooden plinth that elevates today’s edition of The New York Times. Made over 26 successive Sundays between June 5 – November 20, 1977, Lorraine O’Grady’s Cutting Out The New York Times, 1977/2017, examines language, typeface, and coincidence, transforming “found” language from the newspaper into resonant poetry.

Artists include: Becca Albee, Doug Ashford, Luke Butler, Anthony Campuzano, Suzanne Caporael, Nancy Chunn, Mike Cockrill, David Colman, Jennifer Dalton, NiiLartey De Osu, Anne Deleporte, Mark DeMuro, Richard Dupont, Elise Engler, Laura Fields, Avram Finkelstein, Joy Garnett, Skye Gilkerson, Robert Gober, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Gran Fury, Group Material, Matthew Hansel, Rachel Harrison, Lubaina Himid, Theresa Himmer, David Hines, Becky Howland, On Kawara, Ellsworth Kelly, Agnieszka Kurant, Stephen Lack, William Ladd and Steven Ladd, Justen Ladda, Sean Landers, Paul Laster, Leigh Ledare, Elissa Levy, Tora López, Jason Bailer Losh, Dashiell Manley, Walter Martin & Paloma Muñoz, Stefana McClure, Dave McKenzie, Tom Molloy, Maynard Monrow, Aliza Nisenbaum, Lorraine O’Grady, Billy Pacak, Alexandra Penney, PLAYLAB, INC., William Powhida, Richard Prince, Dominic Quintana, Beth Reisman, Hunter Reynolds, Bruce Richards, Guy Richards Smit, Carlos Rolón/Dzine, Randall Rosenthal, Donna Ruff, Michael Scoggins, Lauren Seiden, Paul Sietsema, Adam Simon, Ken Solomon, Ruby Sky Stiler, Linda Stillman, Sarah Sze, Yuken Teruya, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Fred Tomaselli, Jim Torok, Panos Tsagaris, Phoebe Washburn, Evan Whale, Carmen Winant, Andrew Witkin, Yes Men, Mark Zawatski, and Angela Pulido Zorro, and more.

Join the conversation online and follow FLAG’s Instagram (@flagartfoundation) and Twitter (@FLAGartNYC), and use the #TheTimes hashtag when posting.

| ART | Albert Herter at Koenig & Clinton

Albert Herter, The Quincunx Aspect #3, 2016, acrylic ink, colored pencil, oil pastel, marker on paper, 11 x 14 in (27.9 x 35.6 cm). Photo: Jeffrey Sturges, New York.
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Albert Herter: The Quincunx Aspect 
June 3-July 16, 2017
Opening reception: Saturday, June 3, 6-8PM
Closing performance: Saturday, July 15, 6-9PM

Koenig & Clinton is delighted to inaugurate our new Bushwick location with the gallery’s first exhibition of Brooklyn-based artist, Albert Herter. On view are 45 vividly colored works on paper that have been culled from six discrete series that were drawn over the course of the past year.

In keeping with his previous series, Herter’s most recent work features compact and elaborate scenes filled with de-constructed figures that have been staged in a surreal space. Ornate compositions commonly include two or three bodies enmeshed in dialogue or in confrontation. Amidst the dense scape of detail, boundaries between figure and ground, human and nature, threaten to disappear.
From a distance, Herter’s detailed freehand ink and watercolor drawings might resemble those of Old Masters drawings. Closer inspection grants passage through a portal into the interior lives of the cast. Mechanically hinged and dramatically costumed, Herter peels back the surface to render subcutaneous drives and expose competing desires of his characters. Rabelaisian excess reveals the swift accumulation of jouissance.
Determined yet vulnerable, Herter’s troupe initially resemble marionettes that are incapable of grasping their own strings, and yet latent potentials seem to lurk in the very framing of the engagement. The frozen scene is one moment of many in which a wide array of vectors move around and through the figure as actors are transformed into actants.
On Saturday, July 15, Wetware will start to bring Herter’s exhibition to a close with a long-format sound performance. Roxy Farman and Matthew Morandi’s collaborative response to the works on view begins at 6PM.
Albert Herter (b. 1980, San Francisco) holds a BFA in new genres from the San Francisco Art Institute, where he focused primarily on video, installation, and performance. His work has also been the subject of solo exhibitions at San Francisco City Hall and Partisan Gallery, San Francisco. Herter has participated in group exhibitions at: JOAN, Los Angeles; Art in General, New York; Derek Eller, New York; Spiral Gallery, Los Angeles; and Arthouse, McAllen, TX. A pairing of the artist’s drawings and writings were recently published by Comfortable On a Tightrope and Museums Press under the title “In the Curtyard: Orchestrated Reduction of the Fantasm”. His drawings have also been featured in The Third Rail and Lacanian Ink. In addition to his artistic practice, Herter is a practicing Lacanian psychoanalyst. He lives and works in Brooklyn.
For further information please contact info@koenigandclinton.com or call (212) 334-9255. Hours of operation are ThursdaySunday, 11AM-6PM and by appointment at 1329 Willoughby Avenue in Brooklyn.